Posts Tagged ‘tips’

Series on Safety: Lead Paint Poisoning

Posted on: August 11th, 2014 | No Comments

Lead paint removal to prevent lead paint poisoning.Lead-based paints were commonly used on houses and various other products prior to recent decades. It is estimated that lead paint poisoning has claimed a large portion of the 143,000 lives lost to lead poisoning worldwide and causes 600,000 disabilities per year, according to UN health officials. Low and middle income countries are especially prone to this health concern, but 30 countries and counting have phased out lead paint use. The United States banned lead paint in 1978 but over 24 million houses built prior to 1978 are still in use and exposing families to lead paint poisoning. Certain interior items such as antique furniture and toys are also putting people at risk.

 

What: Paint containing lead poisons all systems of the human body. After ingestion or consumption, lead pollutes the blood and results in damage to the brain and central nervous system. High exposure can produce convulsions and eventually lead to a coma or death. Low exposure still affects brain development, especially in young children. Lead paint poisoning has been shown to reduce IQ and attention span, increase antisocial behavior, and decrease academic achievement. Affected adults may see increased risk of kidney failure and raised blood pressure.

 

Where: Lead paint can be found on the outside or inside of older homes as well as on antique furniture and toys, and candy from Mexico. Costume jewelry and other toys passed down through generations within a family might be posing a lead paint poisoning danger.

 

When: As the lead paint on various surfaces begins to peel and decay, it often crumbles into a dust-like substance carried through the air and able to be ingested. In addition, studies claim that children under the age of 6 are at an increased risk of consuming lead by touching items with deteriorating paint and then putting their hands in their mouths.

 

Symptoms: While there are no obvious symptoms, an affected individual may demonstrate tiredness, hyperactivity, irritability, poor appetite, weight loss, trouble sleeping, or stomach aches. Because these symptoms may go unnoticed or attributed to other things, lead paint poisoning often goes unchecked. If you suspect someone you know is being poisoned by lead paint, encourage them to get a blood test.

 

Action: Once lead paint has been ingested or consumed and takes its toll on the body, there is no known countermeasure to undo the damage. Therefore, it’s imperative to take preventative measures.

 

Prevention: Lead paint poisoning can be prevented (especially in children) in several ways.

  1. Check the date of the buildings and houses your where you and your children spend the most time. If any were built prior to 1978, consult a local health official and take measures to reduce prolonged exposure until you know if the lead paint has been removed.
  2. Keep pregnant women and children away from renovations, especially renovations for structures older than 1978.
  3. Wash children’s hands and toys regularly.
  4. Keep children from playing in bare soil. Use a sandbox instead.
  5. Create barriers between your family and any items known to contain lead paint. Fence your house off from the older house next door or keep antique furniture in a room young children don’t enter.
  6. Keep your house free of dust by cleaning consistently.
  7. Get an inspection!

Lead paint poisoning is a serious health concern facing many countries. Even though the United States has banned the use of lead-based paint, old houses and antique or imported items may still pose a considerable threat.

 

Take preventative steps to protect your family from lead paint poisoning. Seek blood tests if you suspect exposure. And consider the inspection services from Inspect-It 1st to see if the painted surfaces or dust in your home are contaminated.

Moving Checklist – Where to Start

Posted on: July 28th, 2014 | No Comments

Moving checklistAre you contemplating a move? Already made the decisions to put your home on the market? This is a big undertaking with a lot of moving parts, so being prepared and organized is important. Today, we’re going through the pre-moving checklist. This list outlines everything you’ll need to do to prepare your home for the sales process.

 

  • Collect the papers: Utility bills, appliance manuals and even notes on paint colors or swatches for fabrics, all of this information can help to entice a potential buyer. It also gives you a chance to get organized and clean out some of the outdated information you may have been hanging onto otherwise.
  • Start getting repair estimates: Is your washing machine acting up or A/C unit on it’s last leg? Some buyers will want a discount on the overall price of the house to replace such things, while others will want them taken care of prior to signing. Repair estimates give you a realistic number and a bargaining chip to be used in during negotiation.
  • Assess your home’s curb appeal…objectively: We know you love your garden gnomes but potential buyers may not get their charm. We have many blogs with useful information about enhancing the look of your home’s exterior.
  • Start going through the clutter: Go through your entire home and begin to sift through everything. Find something you never knew you had? Get rid of it. Six spatulas in the kitchen, 3 can go. Old clothes in the back of the closet are only taking up room. Consider donating to a local charity or host a garage sale to move the merch and make a little money while you’re at it.
  • Start to put away the personal photos and trinkets: People who tour your home are trying to picture themselves in it, not you. Removing these personal touches may seem strange or cold but it can help move the house toward a sale more quickly.
  • Begin the deep clean: By this point in the sales process, you’ve likely boxed up and moved out the majority of your things. In some cases, you may have already moved into the new home or a transitional housing option. Once the house is essentially empty, it’s time to get on your hands and knees and scour everything. Floors, walls, ceiling, appliances, kitchen, bathroom and even the garage should all be gone over with a fine tooth comb. If you’re unable to do the deep cleaning yourself, enlist some family members or contact a local household cleaning company to help.
  • Take a step back: Once the deep clean is complete, it’s your realtors turn to take over. You’ve gotten through the most difficult part of the process and now you can sit back, relax and let your realtor do their job.

We understand that this list may seem overwhelming to start. Fortunately, you can find detailed moving checklists on our homepage to guide you. Each week has specific tasks and recommendation to ensure a smooth transition into your new home.

 

Gutter Cleaning for Beginners

Posted on: June 9th, 2014 | No Comments

Gloved hand performing yearly gutter cleaning.In a previous blog, we mentioned gutter cleaning as an essential part of any spring house cleaning checklist. We received a number of questions about this topic and wanted to answer all of them for you! After reading this, you’ll know most everything you need to about gutter cleaning and maintenance. Then, you can decide whether this task is a DIY project you want to take on yourself or project you’d prefer to hire someone else to do.

 

The importance of gutter cleaning cannot be understated. Gutters only work when they are free of debris and organic matter. If this is not removed, there is a risk of the gutters overflowing and consequently –  water pouring off your roof into the ground below. Water can also seep into the eaves of your home causing damage that could otherwise be avoided. To avoid these issues, it is a good habit to clean gutters at least once a year – twice to be on the safe side.

 

The first thing to take into account when doing your own gutter cleaning is safety. Roofs can be dangerous so take precautions to prevent slips and falls, especially from taller roofs. Be sure to use a sturdy ladder when climbing to the level of your gutters. Some people prefer to stay on the ladder when pulling out the debris and organic matter in gutters, others like to get on the roof directly to clean them out. Either way, being aware of your surroundings, footing and balance are all important to avoid falls. Appropriate apparel, including shoes with a heavy tread and wearing lightweight breathable fabrics can make gutter cleaning a safer and more pleasant experience.

 

Once you’ve prepared for the cleaning it’s time to dive in. Most of what you will find when doing your annual gutter cleaning is decomposing leaves, branches and other organic matter – all great for compost bins! Instead of throwing on the grass to fertilize your lawn, consider raking as much as you can into a compost pile or simply an area of yard where you like to put yard waste. You won’t believe what great fertilizer it will make next spring.

 

While you’re on the ladder gutter cleaning, be sure to pay close attention to the downspouts as organic material can flow down and get stuck. Once you have determined these are clean, make sure you also have a splash block at the bottoms of your downspouts to keep the water from eroding the ground at the base and potentially causing water problems in your home’s foundation.

 

Once you have emptied the gutters, the gutter cleaning can truly begin. Power washers are a perfect way to remove dirt and other materials from your gutters and can be rented at a resonable price from your local hardware store. Anyone who’s used a power washer once knows how fun it can actually be – you’ll find yourself looking for all sorts of outdoor projects that could use a deep clean after winter! When gutter cleaning with a power washer, be careful not to apply too much pressure straight onto the gutters, but rather spray at an angle. If you notice the gutters appear to be unsturdy, consider purchasing new spikes to reattach your gutters to the rafters inside. Over time, these can tend to work themselves out but are easy to replace.

 

Caulking cracks and leaks can also help prevent rotting in the eaves and other damage to your home or gutters. Scrape out old caulk with a chisel, allow the space to dry, then apply new bead silicone. Finally, check downspouts to ensure they are still riveted to the house. If not, reattach them with a rivet gun which can be purchased affordably at your local hardware store as well.

 

Gutter cleaning isn’t the most glamorous yard work, but it is incredibly important. By following the suggestions we have provided above, you can be assured your gutters will do their job during the next rainstorm. Not super excited to get up on your roof, or even stand on a ladder? Most professional landscaping crews offer gutter cleaning services.

 

Learn more about spring home upkeep in our previous blogs on exterior improvements and spring lawn care. Considering a move in the near future? These improvements can not only boost curb appeal but also property value. Home inspectors, like those at Inspect It 1st, examine not only a home’s interior but the exterior as well and assess for any hazards or other modifications that may need to be made. Download our Top 5 Exterior Home Maintenance Tips PDF to learn more. Or, for a full list of inspection services, click here.

 

Siding Options: Things to Consider When it Comes Time to Reside your Home

Posted on: March 18th, 2014 | No Comments

Siding options.The exterior of your home is extremely important, both structurally and aesthetically. There are a huge array of siding options – ranging from stucco to wood to brick, and the list goes on. Each type of siding has its benefits and drawbacks. We wanted to break these options down based on their costs – and the long term outcomes of choosing a certain type of siding over another. Below is an analysis of 4 popular siding options to consider:

 

Vinyl Siding

Benefits:

  • Wide variety of colors and styles available

  • Lightweight but durable

  • Fast installation

  • Can be fitted over old siding

  • 30-50 year lifespan

Drawbacks:

  • Not exceptionally eco-friendly, made with PVC which does not degrade

  • Seams show where the panels meet

Cost: $2-$6 per square foot (installed)

 

Metal/Aluminum Siding

Benefits:

  • Comes prefinished with color or wood grain options

  • Dent resistant

  • Insect and Fireproof

  • Low maintenance

  • 50+ year lifespan

Drawbacks:

  • Dents are permanent

  • Scratches must be touched up professionally

Cost: $3-$5 per square foot (installed)

 

Fiber Cement/Stucco Siding

Benefits:

  • Strong compound which is made to be durable and weather resistant

  • High-end look

  • Does not require painting

  • 30 year warranty (generally)

Drawbacks:

  • Can crack and will need to be touched up

  • Special tools needed for installation, more involved in installation process

Cost: $5-$9 per square foot (installed)

 

Wood Siding

Benefits:

  • Easy to work with and install

  • Appealing to the eye

  • 100+ year lifetime

Drawbacks:

  • Upkeep is more involved; it can involve repainting every 5 years, restaining every 3 years, and redoing the clear finish every 2 years

  • Requires a clean surface to retrofit; all old siding must be removed

  • Species such as Pine or Fir can rot if not properly maintained

Cost: $6-$9 per square foot (installed)

 

Choosing the right siding option for your home is a big decision. Once you narrow down your choices, do your research and contact local contractors for estimates. Return on investment varies as well, whether this is important to you at this point or not, knowing how this investment will play out in the future may also influence your decision.

 

Residing your home is a long-term investment. Doing the appropriate research will help you determine what the best option is for your home. If money is not the bottom line, there are many other factors including region, durability, maintenance, and appearance. These things should all be considered when choosing which type of siding to use on your home. If you are having trouble deciding, get in touch with a trusted contractor whom you feel will give you quality answers to your questions. An informed decision is a good decision. This is your home: invest in it, protect it and enjoy it!

 

Series on Safety: Plumbing

Posted on: March 11th, 2014 | No Comments

Plumbing - Plumber fixing a broken pipe.Winter can wreak havoc on your home plumbing. With arctic temperatures sliding across the United States in recent weeks, many people in the southern half of the country were surprised by unexpected plumbing problems they had never experienced before. From frozen pipes to drainage problems, a cold snap can mean waking up to a big mess. Flooding, even leaks, can cause unhealthy mold growth and leave your home smelling musty and wet. So, how can you avoid frozen pipes? Can you DIY a plumbing job? We have the answers for you.

 

The most prevalent issue when it comes to cold weather and plumbing is frozen pipes. Don’t worry too much if the temps outside dip below freezing as pipes will not freeze until temps hold around 20º according to the University of Illinois Building Research Council. However, temperatures in the sub-zero range can put your pipes in danger. The easiest way to avoid freezing is insulation. Foam pipe insulation sleeves are available at most home improvement stores, and do the trick for exposed pipes in crawl spaces and attics. In addition, electrical tape can be wrapped around smaller sections of pipe to prevent freezing.

 

Another way to prevent frozen pipe problems is to maintain heat circulation throughout the house, including crawl spaces and attics. Any vents that let cold outside air into these spaces should be closed, and heat from the house will be allowed to radiate through them. This minimal heat can help to ensure the pipes don’t freeze through during an extended deep freeze.

 

In the event that your pipes do freeze, there are a few things you can do to prevent them from bursting or other pipe damage. First, turn off the water main to prevent issues after the ice melts. Second, turn on all faucets in the house, just enough so that they dribble. This allows the pressure to be released that can form in frozen pipes. Relieving this pressure can help ensure the expanding ice does not crack or burst your pipes. Lastly, if you want to try manually thawing the pipes, a hair dryer or other radiative source of heat can be used to slowly warm the frozen sections. Do not use an open flame or torch to thaw frozen pipes.

 

Should a pipe crack or burst, a drop in water pressure will be noticeable, and would indicate a problem somewhere in the line. The water main should be turned off immediately to avoid a constant flow of water through the pipes. Even a small crack can create immeasurable damage on your home, so if you notice a small leak or crack, call a plumber immediately and have the cracked section replaced. Even if you cannot see a crack or break, that does not mean it is not there. These problems can occur out of sight, so make sure to keep an eye out for any indications of the presence of water in walls, floors or your ceiling.

 

Be aware of the cold temperatures, and keep an eye on plumbing to keep your home safe and dry. If problems do arise, call a professional. Plumbing is not always something you can learn how to do on the internet, especially large repairs. Avoiding major water damage is a top priority when protecting your family and home. Vigilance when it comes to plumbing care and maintenance is the first defense when cold weather strikes.

 

Radon In Homes – What you Need to Know

Posted on: February 25th, 2014 | No Comments

Radon in homes Radon – This is a term many homeowners have likely heard but do not necessarily know what it is or how it can harm their family. According to the EPA, radon is the leading cause of lung cancer in non-smokers in the United States and can be linked to up to 20,000 lung cancer deaths a year. Here’s what you need to know as a homeowner:

 

  • This radioactive particle is found the air and cause lung cancer in those exposed to large amounts. Radon is produced by the natural decay of uranium in the soil but this decay can be fixed and homes made safe from radon.

  • At home tests are available for testing your home’s radon levels. Generally these accumulate in the basement, nearest the ground where decaying uranium resides. The average concentration of radon in a home in the United States is 1.3 pCi/L. Radon concentrations between 2 and 4 pCi/L should consider fixing their home to protect against exposure to radon. For levels above 4 pCi/L the EPA strongly recommends action to be taken.

  • Contractors are available to test and fix your home. These people are experts in mitigating the risks of radon and ensuring your home is safe.

Contractors can be hired to inspect your home, especially rooms below ground level and those directly above ground level, for radon levels deemed unsafe. If your home does have higher than average radon levels there are a number of options.

 

As stated above, the EPA has set a maximum radon level of 4 pCi/L. Many homeowners take this to mean that anything below this level is “safe”. This simply is not true. Any levels between 2 and 4 pCi/L should still be considered dangerous and steps taken to reduce them. Your contractor will be able to explain the best option for dealing with radon in your home but generally there are three different solutions depending on the structure of our home.

 

  • For homes with basements, one of four types of suction can be used to reduce radon. Essentially, this process uses pipes directly in the earth below the basement slab and fans. The fans create suction below the slab and suck the radon up through the pipe. The open end of the pipe generally leads to an attic or outside the home where the radon is quickly diluted to safer levels.

  • Homes with a crawl space generally will use a thick plastic sheet layed over the earth. Underneath this sheet, a pipe and fan, much like that mentioned above, suck the radon out from the space between the ground and the plastic sheet and ventilate it to the outside. In some cases, ventilation of the space without a plastic sheet can also be used to reduce radon.

  • Any home, no matter the footings can benefit from sealing cracks in the foundation but this should be done in conjunction with other solutions to ensure the radon levels are reduced enough.

  • Ventilation of any space that may have excess radon is always a good idea. In lower levels of home be sure to open windows periodically, run fans to move the air up and out and keep track of radon levels.

The health risks associated with radon mean that all steps necessary should be taken to reduce exposure. Any of the above solutions can be used in conjunction with one another to ensure maximum diffusion. If you have radon accumulation in your home, contact a professional to ensure the correct steps are taken to reduce it’s presence and protect your family. For more information about radon visit the EPA website at http://www.epa.gov/radon/index.html. There you will find information about radon levels in your area, where to find testing kits and the more about solutions to radon in your home.

Professional Landscaping: Is it Worth the Investment?

Posted on: February 11th, 2014 | No Comments

Professional landscaping - Landscaper laying sod in a yard. Have you ever driven through a neighborhood full of perfectly cut grass, beautiful gardens and manicured hedges? You may think to yourself, I could do that! Maybe you can, but landscape architecture is a profession backed by a four year degree and extensive knowledge in botany, horticulture as well as engineering and design. So, what can professional landscaping bring to your yard and is it worth the investment?

 

The rule of thumb for professional landscaping is that by spending 10% of your homes value on landscaping can add up to 20% to the selling price. This is not an immediate return on investment however. It takes about 5 years for plants to fill in, trees to put down strong root and everything to meld together to create a lush gardenscape and lawn. After 5 years you can expect a 75-100% return on investment plus the value it will add to your home in a sale.

 

Yards can also mean a lot to potential buyers. As the first thing they see when they pull up, a well kempt yard gives a great first impression and sets expectations on the inside of the house as well. All factors equal, it is possible a buyer will choose one house over another simply due to the landscaping. Knowing that professional landscaping has already been done also may draw buyers because it is an investment they do not have to make in the future. Maintaining an already landscaped yard is much easier than starting from scratch.

 

Once you decide to use a professional landscaper there are a few things to keep in mind.

  • Certifications for landscape architects do exist. Alongside a four year degree, the American Society of Landscape Architects provides certification to landscape architects. “The Society’s mission is to lead, to educate, and to participate in the careful stewardship, wise planning, and artful design of our cultural and natural environments.” Members obtain certification, continued education and professional support and can be trusted for any landscaping project, large or small.

  • There are lots of options when it comes to landscaping. From simply sprucing up your yard to a complete overhaul, landscape architects are trained and qualified to provide any level of assistance. On a smaller scale adding new gardens, laying sod and planting trees can do wonders for your yard. Other trends include adding terraces, arbors, pools, paving stones along plants, trees and sod. A landscape architect can help assess your property and make suggestions based on your expectations.

  • Maintenance is required. From mowing and pruning to watering and weeding, landscaping takes commitment. You can always build a plan with your architect for upkeep on your own. If that seems a bit overwhelming, landscaping companies generally have teams of people that will come to your house as often as you like to help as much or as little as you wish.

Professional landscaping can seem like just one more thing to do on your property but, the investment is well worth it. From the increase in your property value, to the compliments from your neighbors and homegrown bouquets around the house, landscaping can bring more than just a monetary reward. By doing your research, requesting the guidance of a professional and keeping up with maintenance you will surely see the fruits of your labor for years to come.

 

Are you a new Homeowner? Here’s how to be an awesome homeowner!

Posted on: January 24th, 2014 | No Comments

Homeowner tips for upkeep and maintenance.A new house is exciting! Decorating and making it home is the best part. But, what happens when the move is over and you’re a homeowner in your house as life continues? Houses are also a lot of work. Maintaining your home is the key to maintaining the resale value. Here are a few areas to focus on to keep your home safe and fun:

 

  1. Safety – Keep an eye out for dangers within and around your home. Whether it be an exposed wire or cracked pipes, these things can depreciate the value of your house and put your family in danger. Be realistic with DIY projects too, if you don’t feel 100% confident you can do it correctly and safely, call a professional.

 

  1. Green – By replacing regular light bulbs with fluorescent bulbs you can cut down on electrical bills. Solar panels and other eco-friendly practices can benefit you in the long run especially when it comes time to sell. Create a compost pile in your backyard for easy access to homemade fertilizers, too. By getting in the habit of composting, recycling and upcycling you can cut back significantly on the amount of waste your household produces.

 

  1. Exterior – Curb appeal factors in when it comes time to sell your home. Maintaining the outside of your home has both aesthetic and practical purposes. Peeling paint and broken siding can allow moisture into the walls and cause mold to grow. Beautification also becomes a factor, especially if you plan on selling. Determine your hardiness zone to ensure you select plants that will thrive in your area. By maintaining your lawn & gardens as well as siding & gutters you ensure your home is both attractive and safe.

 

  1. Interior

  • Pipes/Plumbing – Leaking pipes and broken plumbing can cause serious damage and mold growth that can be harmful to you and your families health. If you notice any leaks or problems with your homes plumbing call a professional, this isn’t something you should DIY.

 

  • Furnace – Furnaces are expensive. Get yours checked 2x a year. Ensuring proper maintenance is being given to your furnace can keep you from spending thousands on a new furnace or even prevent a fire started by a furnace problem.

 

  • Flooring – Missing tiles, broken wood flooring and other flooring issues can devalue your home and cause safety issues as well. Be sure to maintain your flooring and fix any issues that may arise. Felt pads will protect your floors from furniture scratches.

 

A home can be the biggest investment you ever make so maintaining it is important. Should you decide to sell your house in the future, this maintenance will help to ensure you pass inspections and get the full value of your home.

Inspect-It 1st has information about home inspection services. In addition the website provides a maintenance checklist that divides the house into sections and outlines maintenance tips and suggestions throughout.

6 Questions to Ask Your Potential Home Inspector

Posted on: December 19th, 2013 | No Comments

inspector_smiling_while_looking_at_a_water_heaterWhether you are buying or selling, having an inspection is the first step to understanding the condition of any residential or commercial space. This information can influence whether you make an offer or how high or low you set the properties price. Inspections can also point out safety hazards and other concerns. That is why it is important to find an inspector who is going to be thorough, knowledgeable and honest. There are many questions to ask a potential inspector to determine if they will exceed your expectation. Here are six that will give you a realistic expectation for service and hopefully narrow down the field for you too.

 

Are you state certified and compliant?
This question should always be your first. These certifications require extensive training and qualification that are necessary for any inspector to do their job effectively. Being compliant is the second part but just as important . Many inspectors will be certified but do not take steps to renew as this certification expires. An up to date certification means an inspector has proven their knowledge and are providing top notch inspections and reports. Since these reports can make a huge difference in price and buyer consideration, having a certified inspector also adds weight to the inspection report.

 

What was your training?
There are many way to become a home inspector. Unfortunately, online courses that provide certification same week are available. These courses are not recommended as they provide no hands on training. When deciding on your inspector be sure to ask for proof of certification, hours of training completed, field experience and continued education. By ensuring your inspector has all of this, you can be assured they are well qualified and competent to perform a top notch inspection.

 

Do you carry insurance?
There are two types of insurance every inspector should hold. The first is Professional Liability Insurance or Errors or Omissions Insurance. Inspectors occasionally may miss something in the chaos that usually accompanies an inspection. This insurance protects you and you inspector from future costs that may be incurred by these errors or omissions. Additionally, General Liability Insurance protects from damage incurred or injury sustained during an inspection. Ask for proof of both of these insurance to ensure you have an inspector who will stand by their report.

 

What type of report will I receive?
Reports can vary between inspectors. Insist on a detailed report including photographs and descriptions. This will be immensely helpful when it comes time to make the necessary repairs and adds accountability and value to the inspection report.

 

Are you an independent inspector or a franchise?
Independent inspectors may not require as much training or continued education as a franchised branch. Be sure to look into the requirements of your state as well as any companies you are considering using to determine their level of training and education. When choosing a franchised inspector you are more likely to find more rigorous training, continued education and insured inspectors. Franchises also tend to hold high standards of customer service and inspection because they represent a larger organization.

 

Do you have any referrals from past inspections?
The opinions of former customers can mean a lot. No referrals should be a red flag to anyone because even though it might mean they were not terrible, it also means they did not provide a stellar inspection. So, do your research and find out what other consumers are saying about the company, services and employees. These can help you narrow down the last few inspectors and find your winner.

 

You may not have known there were so many steps to choosing an inspector but keep in mind, these men and women are catching safety hazards and other concerns with your home. By asking these questions early, doing your research and insisting on education, certification and insurance you are more likely to receive the most thorough report possible. These reports can greatly influence buyer interest and price so the more information you have the better. Don’t settle for anything less than the high expectations set by the questions above.

 

Having trouble finding an inspector you can trust in your area? Check out the Inspect-It 1st website to locate a franchise near you, research services and get your inspection questions answered all in one place.

 

4 Great New Years Resolutions for Home Owners

Posted on: January 4th, 2013 | No Comments

nyhouseAt the beginning of the year, we’re all used to making resolutions for ourselves.  Most of us focus on improving our health (namely our waistlines), but there’s something to be said for resolving to improve your home.

 

That’s right – the beginning of the year is a great time to make a list of resolutions for maintaining and improving your home.  Keeping your home in a good condition and improving its value is the right way to protect and grow your investment.

 

Here are some great new years resolutions for homeowners:

 

Go green: The beginning of the year can be a great time to start new habits, and green habits can not only mean a more eco-friendly lifestyle for your family, they can also save you money.  For example, the New Year is a great time to commit to compact fluorescent light bulbs.  Don’t be put off by the price; these bulbs will last 10 times as long as incandescent, and according to the Department of Energy, swapping out 15 of these bulbs can save you $50 a year.

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Our home inspection company's history began in 1991 with the establishment of American Home Inspection. Over the course of the following seven years, a home inspection business prototype was developed that could be implemented anywhere in the United States. Our founders believed they had a unique methodology of providing homebuyers and sellers with consistent, professional and unbiased home inspections.

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